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Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $72.88


Zen / Chan Japanese Kanji / Chinese Character Wall Scroll


Zen / Chan Japanese Kanji / Chinese Character Wall Scroll
101.5cm
40"
50.6cm
20"

Approximate Measurements

Artwork Panel: 32.6cm x 42.8cm  ≈  12¾" x 16¾"

Silk/Brocade: 41.6cm x 101.5cm  ≈  16¼" x 40"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 50.6cm  ≈  20"

Information about caring for your wall scroll
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禅 modern Japanese Zen 禪 ancient Japanese Zen / Chinese Chan 禅 modern Chinese Chan

Zen / Chan / Meditation

Chinese / Japanese Kanji / old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scroll

Zen / Chan Japanese Kanji / Chinese Character Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the calligraphy artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

This particular calligraphy is done in Kaishu (Regular Script). This style features bold and crisp strokes. It's written on Buddha-Orange xuan paper, etched with a golden pattern. This orange color is used almost exclusively for Buddhist-related Japanese and Chinese calligraphy.

This is the character that is Romanized and pronounced "Zen" in Japanese. This character actually means "meditation" and is often associated with a practice (and sect) of "Meditation Buddhism". This character and concept originally came from China, where this character is Romanized and pronounced "Chan".

The form written on this scroll is one of a couple alternates used in China and Japan: Chan character / Zen Kanji
In modern Japan, it's often written with an extra dot above the radical on the right (3 dots instead of 2): Japanese Zen Kanji
In Chinese, those dots are often written in the strict traditional form as two "mouths" (they look like little boxes/squares): Chan / Zen traditional Chinese version OR Chan / Zen traditional Japanese version
The version written on this wall scroll will be readily-understood by both Chinese and Japanese, though younger Japanese will argue that this is a Chinese form, because of the dot issue mentioned above.

Want a Zen wall scroll completely customized to your desires?
Link: Options for custom Zen and Chan-related Chinese/Japanese/Korean calligraphy are available here!


Chinese and Japanese Calligraphy is only practiced by those with a keen and agile hand. It is an art that dates back thousands of years. Great artists, writers, and poets of China and Japan are often admired for their calligraphy ability and style.

This piece was done by Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping of Beijing.

To create this art, Xing An-Ping used special Chinese ink on Buddha-orange gold-etched xuan paper (rice paper). The raw calligraphy was then taken to our mounting shop in Beijing where some of the best mounters in China laminated this to more sheets of xuan paper and mounted it as a beautiful silk brocade wall scroll.


Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping is a famous calligrapher in Beijing. He's been published and interviewed in magazines numerous times. In Beijing, a city known for its high level of scholarship and calligraphy, Xing An-Ping is rated in the top 200 living masters of calligraphy.

Some random facts about Master Xing:

Master Xing is not only an expert in nine different Chinese scripts, but also can write any of more than 40,000 characters in the Chinese and Japanese lexicons, including alternate forms, without reference to any books. This is very rare, as most calligraphers must consult special reference books to find rare and alternate forms of many characters. Most literate Chinese people of this generation can only read 5000 characters, and perhaps write 3000 of them without reference.

His belief is that art is more important than politics. Therefore, he is more than willing to write Japanese words and phrases. This is rare for a Chinese calligrapher, as most still hold strong distaste for Japan due to the atrocities in Nanking (Nanjing) before and during WWII.

He believes that all religions should be respected. While he sees himself as a Buddhist, and meditates before writing all of this calligraphy, he carefully creates Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and other religious calligraphy artwork upon request of customers in China and around the world.

Unlike many or most Chinese men, Master Xing does not smoke or drink. He eats mostly vegetables and not too much meat (Yes, contrary to popular belief, many Buddhists do eat meat - in moderation). His healthy lifestyle is probably why he is in his late-50's, but looks like he is 40.

He speaks in sophisticated Chinese - they way you expect a doctor or professor to speak. My Chinese is at about the level of a 3rd-grader, so he has to "dumb down" his Chinese when he and I have a conversation.

Master Calligrapher Xing Anping filmed for 2008 Olympics

Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping filmed for the 2008 Olympics by NBC.

Master Calligrapher Xing Anping and I at his studio in Beijing

Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping and I
visit at his studio in the
Haidian District of Beijing.


A summary of when we met and shared philosophies...

When I met Master Xing, in early 2005, I had already looked through the studios of almost 100 top-rated calligraphers, in search of the one I wanted to work with (a process that took two years). I liked the quality and styles I saw in his studio, and we sat down to talk. I told him of my plan to bring very personal and customized Chinese calligraphy to the masses. We talked about catalogs of high-level calligraphy that sells for $2000-$5000 for a single wall scroll. This is fine for a collector of Asian calligraphy, but it puts it out of reach of the common people. I told him that my plan was to offer a beautiful product at an affordable price, while at the same time, educating people about calligraphy and Chinese culture.
He agreed to lower his price in favor of these ideas:
1. His artwork being displayed in over 60 countries around the world.
2. His part in providing education and knowledge about this special art.
3. The fact that I was going to potentially keep him busy with lots of interesting projects.

The final philosophy is, "The legacy of this artwork far outweighs the money received for creating it".

I also found a kindred spirit with Master Xing in the fact that he cares as much about quality as I do. I've always been picky about quality, and thus spent years searching for the best scroll maker in all of China. When I found him, I helped him set up the best mounting workshop ever. We even imported special saws from Sweden, had huge custom glass-top tables made, and recently bought the largest and best artwork press that they make.
Before Master Xing would work with me, he sent me away with a piece of his raw calligraphy to have mounted as a scroll at our workshop. Master Xing had his own favorite mounter, and knowing the quality issues (or lack there of), he wanted to make sure his artwork was going to be mounted using the best materials and craftsmanship. When I brought the scroll back a few days later, he said, "Wow, this is better than mine". He now gets his own artwork for domestic sale at his studio, mounted at our workshop.

Xing Anping writes his craft in his studio

The master calligrapher creates his craft using
traditional and classic materials.

Watching the master do his work

In the past few years, I have become very serious
in my appreciation of Asian calligraphy.
Just watching the way a good calligrapher gracefully
moves and pauses his brush can be mesmerizing.

This item was listed or modified
Sep 16th, 2017

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Gary's random little things about China:

Is "Oriental" politically correct?

Everyone is going to hate me for this, but here is the truth:

Some people who currently prefer to call themselves "Asian-Americans" woke up one morning and decided that "Oriental" is now a word to be used only for Oriental rugs, Oriental art and lamps, or any other inanimate object from Eastern Asia.

When I was teaching English in China, many of my students would refer to themselves as "Oriental", and I would correct them and say, It's better to say that you are Asian or Chinese rather than Oriental, but I was at a loss as to explain why.
My Chinese students were very smart, and came back at me with the fact that being from Asia was too broad a term, and asked if Persians and Saudi Arabians should also refer to themselves as "Asian".

I then had to make excuses for my geographically-challenged fellow Americans* who had long ago replaced the correct term of "Oriental" (meaning the bio-geographic region including southern Asia and the Malay Archipelago as far as the Philippines, Borneo and Java), and replaced it with "Asian" which in truth encompasses half the world's population - many of whom do not consider themselves to be of the same race as those from the Orient.
(For those Americans reading this and who've slept through their high school geography class: It's true, the whole Middle East, and half of Russia are located in the Asian continent)

But I admit I am not helping the problem. You see, almost half the people that find our website did so while searching for "Asian art" and I have done a lot to promote our business as "Purveyors of Asian art". So you can blame me too.
To truly be an Asian art gallery, we would have to offer artwork from beyond the Orient, from places like India, Persia (Iran), most Arab nations, and Russia.

Notes:

There are a lot of things that present problems in the English language.
Usually these problems are thanks to mistakes of the past.
That's why we have to say, "He's an Indian from India" versus "He's a Native-American Indian" (Thanks to Mr. Columbus).

Things to learn:
Do not refer to a Persian (Iranian) as Arab.
If you refer to an Arab-American as being Asian, they will look at you funny and possibly be offended.
If you refer to a person from India as Asian, you will mildly amuse them.
If you refer to a Russian as being Asian, they will pour borsch on you (my ex-wife is Russian, so I know this to be true from experience).
Using "Asian" to refer to a person from Singapore is okay, but they will later, as if by accident, mention that they are in fact from the most civilized country in Asia.

*We citizens of the USA call ourselves "Americans" which seems a bit arrogant to our neighbors who reside on the continents of North and South America. Keep in mind, Canadians and Mexicans are also from North America, but refer to themselves in more correct geographic terms.

Typical Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $72.88